Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Congenital foot conditions often have unique signs, aiding in the diagnosis of underlying systemic issues. Conditions such as Ellis–van Creveld syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, and Marfan syndrome show distinct foot abnormalities. For example, Ellis–van Creveld syndrome may feature extra toes, while fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva can cause deformities in the big toe. Similarly, conditions such as Kniest dysplasia may lead to short and deformed toes, and pseudo- and pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism can result in shortened metatarsal bones. Additionally, acromegaly can cause swelling and softness in the feet, while nail-patella syndrome may affect the toenails. Mucopolysaccharidoses often result in widened toe bones and thickened skin on the feet. If your child was born with a foot abnormality, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as early as possible. 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Wound healing is a complex process that can be significantly delayed in diabetic patients due to various physiological factors. High blood sugar levels characteristic of diabetes can impair the body's ability to repair damaged tissue by disrupting the function of immune cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, responsible for combating infections and initiating the healing process. Additionally, diabetes often leads to poor circulation, reducing the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the site of the wound, which is essential for tissue regeneration. Peripheral neuropathy, another common complication of diabetes, causes nerve damage and diminishes sensation in the extremities, making it difficult for patients to detect injuries and ulcers in their early stages. Furthermore, compromised immune function and increased susceptibility to infections further hinder the healing process. Managing blood sugar levels, maintaining proper foot care, and seeking prompt medical attention for wounds are crucial steps in minimizing the risk of complications and promoting effective wound healing in diabetic individuals. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can provide you with effective wound prevention tips, in addition to helping you manage this serious condition.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 12 February 2024 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Ankle sprains come in various forms, each accompanied by distinct symptoms that highlight the complexity of this injury. The lateral ankle sprain is the most common, occurring when the foot turns inward,which stretches or tears the ligaments on the outer side of the ankle. Individuals experiencing a lateral sprain may encounter pain, swelling, and difficulty bearing weight on the affected foot. Medial ankle sprains, less frequent but equally impactful, involve damage to the ligaments on the inner side of the ankle, often leading to tenderness and swelling. High ankle sprains affect the ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula, causing pain above the ankle and potentially affecting stability. Regardless of the type of sprain, common symptoms include bruising, limited range of motion, and a feeling of instability. If you have endured an ankle sprain, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can determine which type it is and offer appropriate treatment solutions.

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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