Items filtered by date: August 2022

Tuesday, 30 August 2022 00:00

Pain From Morton’s Neuroma

A Morton’s neuroma refers to thickening of nerve tissue at the base of the 3rd or 4th toe. While the precise cause of this condition is unknown, it is thought to form from pressure, irritation, or injury of nerves leading to the toes. This condition can cause one to feel like there is a lump or knot near the ball of the foot, like they are walking on a pebble, or wearing socks that have become bunched up. There can be an achy, sharp, or burning pain in the ball of the foot, or tingling, numbness, or cramping in the forefoot or toes. A Morton’s neuroma can become swollen and painful. One can develop a Morton’s neuroma from wearing shoes that are too narrow where the toes are squeezed together or high-heeled shoes where the body weight is forced onto the ball of the foot. Non-invasive treatments for Morton’s neuroma include wearing properly fitted shoes, with heels less than two inches in height, wide toe boxes, and thick soles, using padding in shoes to take the pressure off the nerve, or taping the feet to redistribute body weight and ease inflammation. Medication and injections can also help relieve pain and pressure of this ailment. Custom orthotics can be made to provide support if one has an abnormal foot structure, such as flat feet or overlapping toes causing the condition. Surgery can be performed if a Morton’s neuroma becomes large or fails to be relieved with more conservative treatment options. Left untreated, a Morton’s neuroma can become worse. For this reason, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment that fits the severity of your specific foot problem.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 23 August 2022 00:00

Working On Your Feet While Pregnant

Many individuals throughout the American workforce spend a significant amount of the workday on their feet. For example, cooks, construction workers, and hairstylists spend most of their time on the clock standing on their feet. There are a few things to be mindful of, however, for pregnant women who hold jobs that require them to stand all day. Standing for prolonged periods while pregnant can not only be dangerous, but it can also be difficult or painful. It is recommended that pregnant women stand for no more than four or five hours while taking frequent breaks throughout the workday. Since pregnant women’s feet are prone to swelling, it is more important to listen to your body and give your feet the rest that they need. As the pregnancy progresses, a woman might notice standing becomes increasingly difficult throughout the workday. Pregnant women might choose to lie down during breaks as well as stay hydrated and elevate their feet. Working on one’s feet is certainly nothing to take lightly, particularly if you are pregnant or are planning to be. Consult with a podiatrist for the best advice on maintaining the health of your feet.


 

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 16 August 2022 00:00

What Is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is a growth of bone that forms from extra calcium deposits on the foot and that stretch from the heel bone to the foot arch. It is one of the most common causes of heel pain. Heel spurs are a quarter of an inch in length or smaller, though they may become larger in some cases. They cannot be seen from outside of the body but can become quite painful, especially when jumping, running, or walking. There may be swelling of the heel and ankle with heel spurs. Some of the primary causes of heel spurs are ill fitting or non-supportive footwear, wearing high heels, bruising under the heel bone, poor posture or other physical structural issues (such as flat feet or high arches), or being overweight or obese. Other possible causes are having a pre-existing medical condition, like diabetes or arthritis, over-training, repetitive hard impact or pressure on the heel, and aging with calcium leaving the bones and settling into the bloodstream and attaching to the surface of bones. Women are more prone to developing heel spurs than men because their hips are naturally wider in comparison to their knees which causes additional pressure to be placed on the heel with movement. Routine foot care and exercises to reduce ligament stress and relieve bone tension will help invigorate heel tissues, but sometimes surgery will be required to remove a heel spur. If you have a heel spur and it is causing pain and interfering with your functioning, consult with a podiatrist who can recommend the best course of treatment.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Monday, 15 August 2022 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 09 August 2022 00:00

3 Tips for Preventing Running Injuries

Running is a widespread recreational activity. However, a large portion of those who engage in running can suffer from running-related injuries at some point in their lives. Injuries to the feet can be common among these running-related injuries. There are several steps that you might take to prevent running injuries to your feet. First, you can be diligent about stretching your feet both before and after your runs, focusing also on the lower calves. This serves to loosen the muscles in your feet, effectively reducing tension and strain. Second, you might consider receiving some kind of regular foot massage treatment to further relax the muscles in your feet. This might be particularly effective if you notice that muscles in your feet or lower legs are becoming sore. Third, you might avoid running on uneven surfaces. This is recommended because uneven terrain can increase the likelihood of falls, which can wreak havoc on your feet. If you engage in running, it is a good decision to consult with a podiatrist about how to proactively prevent running injuries.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

How Aging Can Seriously Affect the Feet

By the time you reach the age of 50, experts say that you will have walked around 75,000 miles. As a result, the general wear and tear on the feet becomes more apparent. Fat pads, skin, and bones get thinner. Feet that have been pushed into tight shoes for years become deformed. Tendons and ligaments lose strength and fail to rebound as quickly. Arches are apt to fall, causing flat feet that can result in longer feet and toes. But many older people continue to wear or buy the same shoe size. Osteoarthritis often sets in, causing inflammation in any number of the foot’s 33 joints. Older people with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, may develop neuropathy and peripheral artery disease, both of which can cause other serious foot problems. All that said, there are ways to lessen the effects of aging on your feet. Consider custom orthotics to counteract the natural decline in foot efficiency. Be on the lookout for sores that do not heal properly. Stretch or do mild exercises to promote circulatory health. Wear shoes that fit properly and offer ample support and cushioning. Pay attention to unusual or new foot pain. Finally, it is wise to consult a podiatrist for regular exams. 

If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and provide you with quality treatment.

Geriatrics and Podiatry
When people age, some common issues that may occur are bone density loss, dry skin, poor circulation, and rough brittle nails. These issues may also affect your foot health if the necessary steps are not taken to alleviate the problems.

It is important to take care of your feet because feet that are injured or diseased can affect your overall health. Having painful feet hinders your ability to do daily activities or may decrease your willingness to do the things that you need to do.

Visiting Your Geriatrician
As we age, health problems become more likely, so it is essential to visit your doctor for check-ups to ensure that you are doing the best you can to take care of your health. It is recommended to check your feet frequently for any possible cuts, bruises, swelling, corns or any other irregularities. 

Taking Care of Elderly Feet
Cracked or dry feet can be treated by applying moisturizer often. It is also important not to wear old socks because the older the sock is, the higher the possibility there will be that there is bacteria there. Wear fresh socks and make sure they fit properly.

Proper foot health means that you can have a more active lifestyle and you will not be bogged down by pain. Foot health also leads to good circulation, which is paramount for overall health.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, Port Richmond, Philadelphia, and Hamilton, New Jersey . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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